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Women's rights in Africa: an examination of African human rights systems in the context of CEDAW and the universalism versus cultural relativism debate.

Faturoti, Bukola

Authors

Bukola Faturoti



Abstract

Many African women suffer discrimination on the grounds of their gender and other factors, such as religion, customs, age and marital status. They continue to be victims of harmful practices whose perpetrators are never held to account because the practices have their roots in cultural values and traditions. Attempts to initiate a change in human rights especially in relation to women, is countered with the argument which rejects the imposition of Western culture on other regions of the world. This argument is based on the premises that human rights should be tailored to people's cultural beliefs and therefore can never be universal. By comparing provisions of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and with examples of African human rights instruments, this article investigates the influence of cultural relativism, if any, on the formulation of women's rights policies in African countries.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Apr 30, 2016
Journal Journal of comparative law in Africa
Print ISSN 2311-6889
Publisher Juta Law
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 3
Issue 1
Pages 149-176
Institution Citation FATUROTI, B. 2016. Women's rights in Africa: an examination of African human rights systems in the context of CEDAW and the universalism versus cultural relativism debate. Journal of comparative law in Africa [online], 3(1), pages 149-176. Available from: https://hdl.handle.net/10520/EJC-60b4cfc84
Keywords Women's rights; Africa; CEDAW; Culture; Relativism; Universalism
Publisher URL https://hdl.handle.net/10520/EJC-60b4cfc84

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