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What should social work learn from 'the fire of social movements that burns at the heart of society'?

Harms Smith, Linda

Authors

Linda Harms Smith



Abstract

That social work should be 'on the side of the poor and the oppressed' in the context of the ubiquitous and increasingly pernicious consequences of global neoliberal capitalism, demands a differently engaged practice (Dominelli, 2004; Ferguson and Lavalette, 2006; Ferguson, 2008; Reisch, 2013; Sewpaul, 2013). This requires 'greater system destabilising and social change efforts, and not the traditional social control and status-quo-maintaining functions of social work' (Sewpaul, 2013: 23). The struggles for social and economic justice waged by global and local social movements may therefore provide insights and impetus for such 'differently engaged' radical and transformative practice. This article explores the processes and strategies of two South African social movements and suggests that social work should incorporate some of the discourses of these movements for expansion of its theoretical base for transformation and social change.

Citation

SMITH, L.H. 2015. What should social work learn from 'the fire of social movements that burns at the heart of society'? Critical and radical social work [online], 3(1), pages 19-34. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1332/204986015X14226342177835

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Mar 1, 2015
Online Publication Date Mar 1, 2015
Publication Date Mar 1, 2015
Deposit Date Apr 6, 2018
Publicly Available Date Apr 6, 2018
Journal Critical and radical social work
Print ISSN 2049-8608
Electronic ISSN 2049-8675
Publisher Policy Press
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 3
Issue 1
Pages 19-34
DOI https://doi.org/10.1332/204986015X14226342177835
Keywords Social movements theory; South Africa
Public URL http://hdl.handle.net/10059/2865

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