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Survival suit volume reduction associated with immersion: implications for buoyancy estimation in offshore workers of different size. (2016)
Journal Article
STEWART, A., LEDINGHAM, R., FURNACE, G., WILLIAMS, H. and COLESHAW, S. 2017. Survival suit volume reduction associated with immersion: implications for buoyancy estimation in offshore workers of different size. Ergonomics [online], 60(6), pages 844-850. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2016.1188219

Rationale: It is currently unknown how body size affects buoyancy in submerged helicopter escape. Method: Eight healthy males aged 39.6 {plusmn} 12.6 year (mean {plusmn} SD) with BMI 22.0-40.0 kg m-2 wearing a standard survival ('dry') suit undertook... Read More about Survival suit volume reduction associated with immersion: implications for buoyancy estimation in offshore workers of different size..

The ability of UK offshore workers of different body size and shape to egress through a restricted window space. (2015)
Journal Article
STEWART, A., LEDINGHAM, R., FURNACE, G., SCHRANZ, N. and NEVILL, A. 2016. The ability of UK offshore workers of different body size and shape to egress through a restricted window space. Applied ergonomics [online], 55, pages 226-233. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2015.11.005

404 male offshore workers aged 41.4 (± 10.7 years) underwent 3D body scanning and an egress task simulating the smallest helicopter window emergency exit size. The 198 who failed were older (P < 0.01), taller (P < 0.05) and heavier (P < 0.0001) than... Read More about The ability of UK offshore workers of different body size and shape to egress through a restricted window space..

Body size and ability to pass through a restricted space: observations from 3D scanning of 210 male UK offshore workers. (2015)
Journal Article
STEWART, A., LEDINGHAM, R., FURNACE, G. and NEVILL, A. 2015. Body size and ability to pass through a restricted space: observations from 3D scanning of 210 male UK offshore workers. Applied ergonomics [online], 51, pages 358-362. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2015.06.017

Offshore workers are subjected to a unique physical and cultural environment which has the ability to affect their size and shape. Because they are heavier than the UK adult population we hypothesized they would have larger torso dimensions which wou... Read More about Body size and ability to pass through a restricted space: observations from 3D scanning of 210 male UK offshore workers..