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The experiences and beliefs of older people in Scottish very sheltered housing about using multi-compartment compliance aids.

Stewart, Derek; Gibson-Smith, Kathrine; MacLeod, Joan; Strath, Alison; Paudyal, Vibhu; Forbes-McKay, Katrina; Cunningham, Scott; MacLure, Katie

Authors

Derek Stewart

Kathrine Gibson-Smith

Joan MacLeod

Alison Strath

Vibhu Paudyal

Katrina Forbes-McKay

Katie MacLure



Abstract

The aim was to describe the experiences and beliefs of older people surrounding the use of MCAs, with emphasis on issues of personalisation, reablement, shared decision-making, independence and support. This was a qualitative study comprising individual face-to-face interviews conducted by a researcher with extensive experience in qualitative interviewing. The study was conducted within 'very sheltered housing' (VSH) complexes in the north east of Scotland. In the UK, 'sheltered housing' describes rented housing for older and/or disabled or other vulnerable people, usually in grouped developments. VSH generally has all the features of sheltered housing, but has enhanced care and support through the service of extra wardens, full-time carers, assistance with everyday living, including assistance with medication, and provision of meals.

Citation

STEWART, D., GIBSON-SMITH, K., MACLEOD, J., STRATH, A., PAUDYAL, V., FORBES-MCKAY, K., CUNNINGHAM, S. and MACLURE, K. 2018. The experiences and beliefs of older people in Scottish very sheltered housing about using multi-compartment compliance aids. International journal of clinical pharmacy [online], 40(2), pages 394-402. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11096-017-0580-x

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Dec 13, 2017
Online Publication Date Jan 13, 2018
Publication Date Apr 30, 2018
Deposit Date Jan 5, 2018
Publicly Available Date Jan 5, 2018
Journal International journal of clinical pharmacy
Print ISSN 2210-7703
Electronic ISSN 2210-7711
Publisher Springer
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 40
Issue 2
Pages 394-402
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s11096-017-0580-x
Keywords Ageing; Behavioural medicine; Geriatrics; Patient adherence; Patient education; Primary care; Scotland
Public URL http://hdl.handle.net/10059/2639